Apr

22

Oasis Colonics in Portland, Oregon uses the “Closed System” colon hydrotherapy equipment.  People often ask me what the difference is between the “Open” and “Closed” colonic systems.

Colon Hydrotherapy uses specific equipment to introduce water into the large intestine, or colon, in order to release waste.   Two kinds of equipment exist. One is the “closed-tube” system.  The other is the “open-basin” system.  They are commonly referred to as “Closed” and “Open” systems.

“Hydro” means water; colon hydrotherapy is a form of water therapy. Colonic systems introduce water into the colon or large intestine, and allow water and waste to exit.  In colonics water has the potential to reach the cecum or beginning of the ascending colon.

Water filters are used with both types of equipment.  Equipment can have from two to six filters.  UV light and activated carbon/charcoal filters are also used additionally with some equipment.  Water temperature is controlled with the temperature gauge.  The water is generally kept close to body temperature.  Water can be used at warmer and cooler temperatures for additional therapeutic effects.  Both systems involve plumbing of water and waste lines according to code.  Most equipment is FDA approved.

Closed Colon Hydrotherapy System
With the closed-tube system, the water pressure can be adjusted for each inflow.  This means water enters the colon very slowly or potentially less than 1/2 psi (pound per square inch).  The time of one session typically ranges from 40-65 minutes.  The speculum is the instrument that is inserted into the anus, and allows the water to flow in and out.  The speculum is approximately 3/4″ in diameter.  It is gently inserted 2-3 inches into the colon.  It comfortably holds the anus open during the session, thereby removing the need for the recipient to push the waste out. The water line connects to the incoming water line on the equipment, and the waste line attaches to an illuminated glass viewing tube that allows for observation of what is eliminated.  The waste goes out the speculum into the disposable waste line, then empties directly into the sewer system after passing through the view tube.  The waste is “closed” to the air, hence the term “closed-system”.  The recipient remains on the treatment table throughout the process.  A professional therapist administers the colon hydrotherapy session, and is present during the entire session.  The sessions consist of a series of inflows and outflows that can be accompanied by abdominal massage.  Many people prefer the closed-system above any other method of colon entero-lavage.

Open Colon Hydrotherapy System
With the open-basin system, the table on which the client rests has a basin set into it.  The equipment is plumbed to the sewer system from the bottom of the basin.  The client’s hips are at the edge of the basin so intestinal waste may fall easily into it.  The waste is “open” to the air, hence the term “open-system”.  Water comes from a gravity tank system and/or a pressure system set in a cabinet at the foot or side of the table.  Tubing connects the tank with the speculum.  The equipment is designed so that either the therapist or the recipient may administer the session.  Water pressure is regulated.  The maximum pressure is 1.4 psi in gravity mode and 3 psi for pressure flow.  The speculum for the open-basin system is narrower than a pencil in diameter and 4 – 10” long.  It goes into the anus about 2 – 4″.  The recipient pushes when he/she feels the urge to defecate.  The water and waste are expelled around the tube and into the basin.  The recipient can also choose to retain water in the colon during the session.  For the open-basin system, the client remains one position to accommodate the basin.  The open-basin works particularly well with spina bifida, paraplegics and quadriplegics or any other population that has extremely loose sphincters muscles.

Conclusion
Besides helping with constipation, irritable bowel syndrome, excess gas and eliminating parasites, other therapeutic uses for colon hydrotherapy include restoring muscle tone, stimulating lymph, calming the nervous system, relieving and restoring the immune and endocrine system, re-positioning the intestines, hydrating, warming or overcoming hypothermia, jump-starting the GI tract, assisting during a life-style change, drug detoxing, pre-surgery, before a barium x-ray, endoscopy, sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy, releasing toxic emotions and counter-acting the effect of pain medicine on peristalsis.

Each person should feel free to explore and experiment to find which system works best in their situation.  It requires time, energy, perseverance, discipline, trial and error and a sense of humor to cleanse effectively and thoroughly.  People must also work with diet, fluid, exercise, herbs and attitude to help promote the loosening of waste.  Sometimes it takes a long time to cleanse the GI tract, heal the walls and restore peristalsis.

This content of this post is from my main blog at OasisColonics.com

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